Daniela Ginta, The Mindful Writer

Freelance Writer and Photographer, Author of the Mindfulness Blog

Category: Self-improvement Page 1 of 25

Webinars, red onions and the basics of fighting bad bugs (or at least having fun while trying)

I have by now received at least 20 invitations to webinars about coronavirus-related topics. Doctors, herbalists, naturopaths, and then more doctors, they are all trying to add to the pool of knowledge and also make the time in ‘captivity’ a bit better. I’ll let you know which made an impact.

Meanwhile, if you want to get an idea about this type of pandemics, here is a talk by Dr. Michael Greger (the brain behind https://nutritionfacts.org and author of How Not to Die and How Not to Diet) which will make say Ha! at least five times, but likely more. Because of how timely the information is though the talk is more than a decade old. (Bonus: it has a transcript too!)

It beats watching the news obsessively and it makes for good conversation with quarantine fellows. The more knowledge, the higher the chance of keeping disease-free. Or?

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Weekly column: People in Kamloops care and that means everything right now

Originally published as a column on CFJC Today Kamloops and Armchair Mayor News on Monday March 30, 2020.

It was almost three weeks ago that I last saw Jessie Simpson, my every Sunday afternoon buddy. We parted with him asking ‘What are we going to do next week when you come?’ and I answered, ‘We’ll find something fun.’

A few days later, just like that, the world that contains him and the other vulnerable people in that long-term care facility closed its doors. Then everything happened faster than anyone could predict and here we are, all hunkered at home and wondering what’s next.

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Weekly column: No, we are not making too much of it

Originally published as a column on CFJC Today Kamloops and Armchair Mayor News on Monday, March 23, 2020.

The verbs du jour alternate between ‘social distancing’ and ‘self-isolating’, but in order to remove the negative connotations of the first, we are advised to call it ‘physical distancing’. Because we are, in many ways, closer than ever. Whatever you call it, please make sure you abide. Which brings me to the question that pops up a lot in social media circles: are we making too much of it?

Short answer: no.

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Weekly column: Everyone must do their part to help flatten the curve

Originally published as a column on CFJC Today Kamloops and Armchair Mayor News on Monday March 16, 2020.

It happened two days ago in a local store: the person in front of me bought $300 worth of hand sanitizer.

Here we are, increasingly engulfed by the reality that is the COVID-19 pandemic. It is happening and it’s getting closer. Some store shelves are empty – the mysterious case of toilet paper stockpiling is still ongoing, and the shortage of sanitizing products is troubling.

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In troubling times, choose what to focus on

Life as we know it is changing every day. New routines and measures are popping up every day and it takes some solid pep talk to not succumb to panic. We will see better days, just not yet. Not for a while. There will be bad ones, possibly many, before things get better. There are graphs and simulations and news coming from all directions. Some will provide good information and others will also make your hair stand on end, factual as they may be (try this link for a reliable bird’s eye view.) Still, the worst is not knowing. And yet, putting all your energy into hunting down more information than available in the media (which is by everyone’s standards, A LOT,) might not take you to the place where you are settled enough to do your work, or connect with your loved ones, or just be with yourself without panic.

So, about that.  

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Weekly column: Personal responsibility can help prevent future tragedies

Originally published as a column on CFJC Today Kamloops and Armchair Mayor News on Monday March 9, 2020.

On a fateful day in 2012, somewhere on Salt Spring Island, a set of bad decisions ended up changing many people’s lives for the worst and ending one. Calder McCormick and Ryan Plambeck, then 17 and 18 years old respectively, left a house party in an advanced state of intoxication due to alcohol and marijuana, got in a car that was not theirs and crashed shortly after.

McCormick survived but suffered brain trauma which left him unable to pursue further education or even ride a bicycle, while Ryan Plambeck died at the scene of the crash. He was behind the wheel but did not have a valid driver’s license. Heartbreaking and yet preventable.

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Weekly column: We need driving laws that protect pedestrians first

Originally published as a column on CFJC Today Kamloops and Armchair Mayor News on Monday, February 17, 2020.

A while back I read a book that was as poignant as it was scary. It is called A deadly wandering: A tale of tragedy and redemption in the age of attention, by Matt Richtel (William Morrow, 2014). I mentioned it at the time because of the high volume of drivers busted driving and texting at the time. I am picking up the topic again because somehow the issue of distracted driving does not seem to go away. How could it? The people at the other end are doing their best to keep our attention hooked to the devices through whatever pings and screen traps necessary.

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